High-pressure pipes for the world’s largest liquefied natural gas project

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August 2012Dunlop Oil & Marine has been awarded its largest contract to date to supply high-pressure hoses to the oil company Chevron Australia. The hoses will form part of the world’s largest liquefied natural gas extraction project off the coast of Western Australia.

The order includes the manufacturing of couplings, lines and other connected products. Dunlop Oil & Marine will be supplying over 70 km of hose and more than 15,000 couplings for this project to factories in Korea, Indonesia and Australia. The air, water and nitrogen hoses will be manufactured in Ashington (UK). They will be used for a wide range of different applications, including hot air blowers, water supplies and as flushing pipes. “As this project demands impeccable delivery timing, strong project management is essential,” stresses Dr. Kambiez Zandiyeh, General Manager of Dunlop Oil & Marine. “However, this is the kind of challenge our experienced team in Ashington is used to.”

The Gorgon gas project, which is also known as the Greater Gorgon Area gas project, is currently the biggest project to extract and produce liquefied natural gas anywhere in the world. From 2014, it is forecast that the project will deliver enough liquefied natural gas to meet around 8% of global demand, with most of the LNG produced heading for the Asian market. According to latest estimates, the gas deposits are expected to last for the next 60 years. The eleven gas fields are situated around 130 km off the coast of Western Australia at a water depth of approximately 200 m. An offshore system of pipelines and large-scale industrial natural gas pumping systems is currently being constructed in a 235 km² region around Barrow Island, along with three gas liquefaction plants on land, which are due to extend over an area of some 300 ha.

The three international oil companies involved in the project are developing what is one of the world’s largest natural gas reserves. The gas sources are also connected via underwater pipelines to the north-western coast of Barrow Island. From here, the gas is pumped through an underground pipeline system to the processing and liquefaction plants on the southeastern coast of the island. The factory plant will comprise three liquefaction plants, each with an annual capacity of 5 million tons of LNG.

LNG and the natural gas liquids will be initially stored in tanks on land, before they are then transferred to LNG tankers for overseas shipment from a 2.1 km long wharf. The natural gas destined for Australia will be pumped through a 70 km underwater pipeline to the mainland.

The costs for the project are projected to be in the region of $37 billion. An estimated 10,000 temporary jobs will be created during the construction phase, with the gas extraction and production industry delivering around 3,500 long-term jobs.

The environment will also benefit from the project, as this method of producing electrical energy generates and releases around 60% less CO2 than other methods. The CO2 generated during gas liquefaction will be injected into geological strata under the island, where it will then be stored.

High-pressure pipes for the world’s largest liquefied natural gas project

High-pressure pipes for the world’s largest liquefied natural gas project

High-pressure pipes for the world’s largest liquefied natural gas project